Armory Program News

De Materie

"Few institutions have been as adept at pushing the cultural FOMO button that New Yorkers hate almost as much as slush puddles and bedbugs. ‪De Materie‬, seems poised to become one of the most talked-about events of the spring season." - Corinna da Fonesca-Wollheim, The New York Times
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Recital Series: Roderick Williams

“Roderick Williams proved a natural and expressive communicator, with Susie Allan’s elegant playing an ideal foil for his eloquent delivery. He imbued each song with myriad colorful nuances, his rich, burnished baritone lovely throughout the evening.” - Vivien Schweitzer, The New York Times
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Recital Series: Lisette Oropesa

"The lovely lyric soprano Lisette Oropesa gave a rewarding performance with the stylish pianist John Churchwell, singing a thoughtful selection of songs with operatic richness and charisma." - Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
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Goldberg

"Bach’s masterpiece is hardly simple. To perform the Variations is itself a feat of endurance, one that Igor Levit accomplishes with dancing rhythms, gracious lyrical continuity, and a steely, formidable technique." - Russell Platt, The New Yorker
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"No cell phones, no watches, no cameras. This is not the start of a Luddite how-to manual, but rather Marina Abramović's proposed requisite for listening to classical music. Put into practice in Goldberg, the Park Avenue Armory's latest cross-disciplinary commission, Abramović's collaborator, Russian-German pianist Igor Levit, is willingly entering her framework (also known as the Abramović Method for Music) to give a series of seven performances that began Monday and will continue through December 19. Each night an audience of 600 joins Levit after depositing all of their belongings into lockers and listen as he plays Johann Sebastian Bach's famed 1741 composition the Goldberg Variations." - Hayley Weiss, Interview Magazine
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"Lush, vibrant, sensitive… Igor Levit’s playing was amplified by the staging into something cosmic while retaining a tender human pulse. The effect was stunning." - Zachary Woolfe, The New York Times
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"‪Goldberg‬ is a rigorous version of Bach’s intricate, ecstatic solo-piano epic. Igor Levit will play on a stage of Marina Abramovic’s devising: a motorized platform that slowly moves from the far side of the Drill Hall to the center, then turns a single revolution as Levit goes through Bach’s 30 variations." - Jason Farago, The New York Times
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Recital Series: Christian Gerhaher

"'The Book of Hanging Gardens' is an atonal song cycle based on poems that obsessively dissect a love affair in 15 feverish verses. Christian Gerhaher, who gave a vulnerable and intense performance of the work, has said that the cycle is 'like Christmas, 15 times over.'" - Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim, The New York Times
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HABEAS CORPUS

"The conjunction of stories from New York and Guantánamo seems to crystallize Anderson’s intention: she was drawing a line between the fear of evil and the evil that fear can create." - Alex Ross, The New Yorker
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“Images can humanize, but physical presence does even more. Even in this age of digital immediacy, the power of the physical is undeniable. By bringing Gharani to New York City as a three-dimensional livestream, Anderson portrays distance and intimacy all at once; an apt metaphor for the American public’s relationship to Guantánamo.” - Cora Currier, The Intercept
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"Mohammed el Gharani, one of the youngest detainees in Guantánamo history, will sit in silence, inviting viewers to meditate on the relationships between taking time and serving time, absence and presence, what is human and what is inhuman. He will also tell stories, elaborating on the years he spent in Guantánamo." - Priscilla Frank, The Huffington Post
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"I had planned this as a meditation about real time and telepresence: how to be there and not there at the same time. Like all former Guantánamo detainees, Mohammed is not allowed to come to the U.S. I had imagined HABEAS CORPUS as a work of silent witness, deriving its power from live streaming, technology, and stillness—a work of equally balanced presence and absence." - Laurie Anderson, The New Yorker
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Tree of Codes

"Dancers from the Paris Opera Ballet Company and Company Wayne McGregor move in a serpentine and grounded manner, mimicking Jamie xx's dreamy, experimental score. Through Eliasson's projections and reflective layers, dancers are sharply reflected in a vibrant house of mirrors, allowing their bodies to extend infinitely into the distance. Unlike a typical performance, the audience is also reflected back at performers, sometimes even underneath the glow of a spotlight. You can, quite literally, see yourself in this ballet." - Haley Weiss, Interview Magazine
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"‪Tree of Codes‬ is a world where optical wonders open up doors to the unexpected. Layer after layer, the optical games continue to amuse, with dancers and sets in constant flux, keeping one’s senses alert at all times." - Gabriella Daris, ArtInfo
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"The rich meld of Company Wayne McGregor & Opéra National de Paris, their disparate training, combined with the intense sound of Jamie xx and visual elements of Studio Olafur Eliasson, gives the audience total engagement from the toes right through the head." - Pia Cotton, Wall Street Journal
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Under Construction Series: Andrew Ondrejcak

"Andrew Ondrejcak is a writer, director, and designer of performances, theater, opera and fashion shows. Watch as Andrew moves through the collaborative process of birthing a new work, ELIJAH GREEN as part of Park Avenue Armory's Under Construction Series. Inspired by August Strindberg’s "A Dream Play," the piece follows a divine spirit as it wanders through contemporary life, where each individual character is both the center of the world and a part of something larger they cannot comprehend." , American Theatre Wing
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H {N)Y P N(Y} OSIS

"A shifting, spectral wonderland, where moments of thrumming noise and dazzling movement contrast spectacularly with sequences that convey a quieter more melancholy sensibility." - Gabriel Coxhead & Ali Morris, Wallpaper Magazine
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"A thrilling exhibition that shimmers between genres, from sci-fi to fantasy, children’s adventure to horror. H {N)Y P N(Y} OSIS is near perfect." - Scott Indrisek, ArtInfo
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"Objects are illuminated and switched off, films begin and end, and live piano music stops and starts in a timed sequence lasting two and a half hours. But you don’t need to stay for it all to be enthralled by H {N)Y P N(Y} OSIS’s spellbinding charms." - Howard Halle, Time Out New York
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"Almost every part of the imposing Armory building will be put to use for his purposes: the skylight blinds will rise and descend to create periods of darkness and light; the exterior walls will be fitted with microphones, to bring in amplified street sounds, which will be translated into piano music that will cause interior lights to surge, flicker and dim along with the urban thrum; immense screens will be used for films but also as floating walls; and the trusses will be hung with more than two dozen of Mr. Parreno’s signature sculptural pieces, translucent ghostly marquees that look as if they were severed from their worldly theatrical origins and elevated to Platonic form." - Randy Kennedy, The New York Times
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FLEXN

“Get-low, gliding, bone-breaking, connecting, pauzin, waving: Even the language of flexing, a street-dance style born in Jamaica and raised in the Brooklyn neighborhood of East New York, pops with energy. Flip through the enormous program book for Flexn, a show of grand proportions at the Park Avenue Armory, and you’ll find a “Flexapedia” defining these terms. It’s a glossary of action words. Flexing is doing. Dance as action, as forward momentum.” - Siobhan Burke, The New York Times
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tears become…streams become…

"Then, very slowly, water started seeping up from cracks between the black wood panels. Soon, small shiny pools started forming. As the pools grew, you saw reflections of the Drill Hall’s ceiling as well as mirror images of the people sitting around the rim. It took about 20 minutes for the entire floor to fill with water, in silence. The process was riveting. Expanding pools of water kept swallowing up dry patches of the floor that continually changed shape. Hélène Grimaud then began a 60-minute program, an inspired selection of pieces by Berio, Takemitsu, Ravel and others that in various ways explore images and sensations of water." - Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
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"In an installation conceived by the Scottish conceptual artist Douglas Gordon, the French pianist Hélène Grimaud will perform a one-hour program of works inspired by water, as a controlled flood transforms the hall into a giant, glassy lake. In a slow creep, the water — all 122,000 gallons of it — will occupy nearly 33,000 square feet and, mirrorlike, turn the armory’s ceiling upside down, plunging it into what seems to be a bottomless, liquid-filled space." - Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
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St. Matthew Passion

"The long, daunting passion is a ritualized form of participatory theater. Bach wrenches you out of your comfort zone as an audience member and pulls you into this story of faith and doubt, trust and betrayal, community and mob chaos. All of these qualities came through in the searing, sublime performance on Tuesday, the first of two, bringing to an end a mini-residency in New York for the Berlin Philharmonic, which had already played four concerts at Carnegie Hall." - Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
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The Passenger

“The tension between past and present is not just embedded in the music and libretto but built right into the spatial concept of the imposing production by the director David Pountney. A two-tiered set, designed by Johan Engels, shows the airy upper deck of the ocean liner, where passengers mingle, wearing elegant suits and dresses of creamy whites. But just below, we see the hellish concentration camp, where stacked flat beds and freight bins roll in and out on railroad tracks.” - Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
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MACBETH

“When you have thirty guys charging through the battle in this earth, the audience needs to be expecting to interface with the, shall we say, earthly qualities of the show,” Leaver said diplomatically. - Sophie Brickman, The New Yorker
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“Mr. Branagh’s muscular, bloody, fast-paced Macbeth” begins with “a fierce, wet, muddy, bloody, intricately choreographed extended fight that takes place inches away from the audience,” signaling a “headlong rush of breathless action, [with] each scene blending rapidly into the next.” - Sarah Lyall, The New York Times
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Macbeth will get one more tomorrow after all...” - Pia Catton, The Wall Street Journal
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Recital Series: István Várdai

"Mr. Vardai’s trills unfolded with elegant grace in his soulful rendition of the Allemande, and the Courante flowed with a joyous energy." - Vivien Schweitzer, The New York Times
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Recital Series: FLUX Quartet

"Brilliant performance..." - George Grella, New York Classical Review
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The xx

"The sound was as good as any concertgoer could ask for, and the group's performance matched it..." - John DeFore , The Hollywood Reporter
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"At the Armory, we were hostages dropped into the dry expanse of a field, feeling smaller but entirely alert." - Sasha Frere-Jones, The New Yorker
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Recital Series: Igor Levit

"...performer and listeners alike were unnerved to find themselves sharing a private moment in a public setting." - Alex Ross, The New Yorker
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The Life and Death of Marina Abramović

"This stunningly beautiful theater production largely steps away from dimensions of the now-successful artist's life, staging a biography of her psyche instead — a far more daring strategy that brings splendid rewards. Wilson's gorgeous stage compositions immerse us in Abramovic's psychological milestones,,, The finale is visually sublime. Despite its bold title and playful frame, the production amounts to far more than a hagiography of an art star or a funeral stunt. It is an expressive metaphysical pageant, reflecting on how an extraordinary life can defy death through art." - Tom Sellar, Village Voice
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"The show unfurls in a series of loosely connected, enigmatic set pieces set to haunting music. Some of it is recorded and some of it is live: art songs by Antony, Serbian folk by Svetlana Spajic, dissonant electronics by the duo Matmos. This feast for the senses lets theatergoers draw their own conclusions — or just sit back, relax and enjoy the gorgeous scenery." - Elisabeth Vincentelli, New York Post
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Christian Gerhaher Recital

"In a design statement, the architects of Herzog & de Meuron, the firm behind the renovation of the Board of Officers Room, use the verb “de-layer” frequently to describe the delicate process of stripping down successive strata of paint and plaster in a way that pays respect to both the original design and the passing of time. In many ways, Mr. Gerhaher’s performance is also one of de-layering, as his utterly unaffected yet profound interpretation tunnels back through time to the emotional seed of each song." - Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim, The New York Times
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Massive Attack V Adam Curtis

"A full-time producer-director with the BBC, Curtis spent the better part of his off hours over a period of seven months creating the film and site-specific show, and collaborating with the band’s Robert Del Naja. United Visual Artists also had a hand in the design and staging, which will include 11 gigantic screens in the Park Avenue Armory. Meant to expose the hidden realities of “this strange anxious age,” the performance will remind audiences of the more arresting moments in politics and power over the past 30 years, Curtis said." - Rosemary Feitelberg, Women's Wear Daily
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"Inspired by a Damon Albarn opera at the Manchester International Festival in 2011, Robert Del Naja, of trip-hop progenitors Massive Attack, hatched the notion of a collaboration with documentary filmmaker Adam Curtis. The result, Massive Attack v Adam Curtis, arrives in New York City this week, so TONY grilled Del Naja about the show: part cover-versions concert, part film and wholly political." - Marcia Adair, Time Out New York
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"The music Massive Attack play spans decades, from Barbra Streisand and Nirvana to Siberian punk rock and Bauhaus. Horace Andy comes out to sing the Archies' "Sugar, Sugar" as video flashes images of minstrel shows and other distasteful imagery. Del Naja is particulary proud of that moment." - John Gentile, Rolling Stone
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"Immersive doesn’t really begin to describe “Massive Attack V Adam Curtis”, the multimedia onslaught currently being staged at New York City’s gargantuan, airplane-hangar-like Park Avenue Armory." - Matthew Solarski, Consequence of Sound
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"The sound is a marvel, properly immersive, but not too loud or cavernous. (United Visual Artists, the British art and design shop, is in charge of the installation and got it right.) This project was commissioned by the Armory, the Manchester International Festival, where it had its first performance last summer, and the Ruhrtriennale International Festival of the Arts. If it has a further life as a film with music, screenable without the band’s live performance, it could lodge in international culture as a perpetual undergraduate mind-blow — a more political “Koyaanisqatsi,” say." - Ben Ratliff, The New York Times
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" “Neither of us, Robert nor I, quite know what we’ve created,” Curtis tells me via Skype. “I call it a ‘provocative entertainment’ about what we’ve lived through over the past 50 years, from the idealism of the sixties through the collapse of those dreams in the seventies and their replacement by the triumph of a kind of managerial stasis, an imaginative paralysis imposed upon us by the powers that be—the marketers, the hedge-funders, the politicians, and I emphatically include the journalists in this—in which no one anymore aspires to a brighter vision of tomorrow, let alone toward the effort of realizing such a vision, in which we are constantly being told that this is all there is, this is how it has to be. But it’s worse than that,” he adds quickly. “Because we are constantly being fed these two-dimensional visions of the past, the dead past—not just in terms of fears but also desires. If you liked that, then you will love this.” " - Lawrence Weschler, New York Magazine
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The Machine

"Whether The Machine, at the Park Avenue Armory, is ultimately convincing at suggesting artificial intelligence will eventually supersede human thought capacity remains up in the air by fade-out. What precedes the questionable denouement, however, has enough high-wattage action to keep audiences enthralled." - David Finkle, The Huffington Post
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"That is a road not taken by Mr. Charman’s play, which has been staged with magnifying spectacle and at a breathless pace by Josie Rourke, the artistic director of the Donmar Warehouse in London." - Ben Brantley, The New York Times
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"Vigorously directed by Josie Rourke, obsession surfaces as the central theme. As The Machine flutters back and forth in time, one principal remains, and that’s the limitless power of talent unleashed by inexhaustible determination." - Celia Ipiotis, Eye on the Arts
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"The savvy opening move of The Machine, a tautly entertaining and superbly acted new play by Matt Charman is to reconfigure the central battle entirely, turning man-vs-machine into man-vs-men-who-created-machine." - Adam Markovitz, Entertainment Weekly
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Paul McCarthy: WS

"Blood, excrement, alcohol and M & Ms flew through the air as Mr. McCarthy took down targets ranging from Walt Disney (“WS” stands for Snow White backward), himself (the ranch house was a replica of his childhood home) and America’s lust for bigness and waste." - Holland Cotter, The New York Times
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"In making the experience of his art so visceral, so gutter-level and cannily extreme, he takes us with him on this physical journey into the heart of horror. We may feel soiled by it, or disgusted, or moved. But whatever we feel, it’s likely to be strong. McCarthy saves us from the morally vacant stance of cool appraisal." - Sarah Kaufman, The Washington Post
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"I will say that I’m awed by the spectacle and scale of the thing. McCarthy's ability to occupy and take over space, even the most impressive interior in New York City, is undeniable, impressive, singular. I doubt that anyone has ever been able to do this to this extent in this space before." - Jerry Saltz, New York Magazine
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"Although her name may not be a familiar one, the young actress Elyse Poppers has become the talk of New York. Paul McCarthy, the provocative, powerful and acclaimed performance artist, filmmaker, installation artist and sculptor, has discovered and uncovered his "muse." In his wildly attended, X-rated Park Avenue Armory show and at Hauser & Wirth galleries, both uptown and down, Poppers is depicted as Snow White, Natalie Wood, and herself, in a silicone sculpture so exacting as to be stupefying." - Elizabeth Sobieski, The Huffington Post
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"I am convinced that White Snow is one of the great works of our century, as sprawling, multivalent and rich as the novels that marked the turn of the 20th." - Jarrett Earnest, San Francisco Arts Quarterly
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"Paul McCarthy’s film-and-sculpture installation, “WS,” which fills the immense drill hall of the Park Avenue Armory, is basically a Yahoo epic, its satire framed in the language of Disney, Duchamp, 1950s suburbia, 21st-century greed and Craigslist pornography. The piece is grand and gross, with ambushing flashes of beauty and an X rating." - Holland Cotter, The New York Times
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" “WS” proves that the artist can still leave you feeling a bit shaken." - Rozalia Jovanovic, Artinfo
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"This enchanted forest is a dangerous one." - Kathleen Massara, The Huffington Post
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"Compared with Mr. McCarthy, even much of the contemporary art world can seem puritanical and hygienic. And in “WS” — short for “White Snow” — he has, if anything, pushed his own boundaries." - Randy Kennedy, The New York Times
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"If a little too much money was thrown at “WS,” it is merely a reminder that we have created a society where far more obscene things are happening all the time. Considering that too much money is in the hands of the undeserving few, we are relatively fortunate that some has trickled down into the messy lap of Mr. McCarthy." - Maika Pollack, Gallerist
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Trisha Brown Dance Company: ASTRAL CONVERTED

"At the Armory, though, the vastness is more sensed than seen, for once the dance begins, all the lighting originates from a relatively small stage area. Little illumination escapes. The performers materialize out of darkness, and they dance with darkness around and especially above them, alone in the cosmos." - Brian Seibert, The New York Times
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Tom Sachs: SPACE PROGRAM: MARS

"The geeks are in charge at “Space Program: Mars”, Tom Sachs’s wacky and intoxicating art immersion experiment, where limitless outer space is compressed into the prodigious but finite expanse of the Park Avenue Armory drill hall. - Ariella Budick, Financial Times
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- Tom Chen, Artinfo

"Now we have Tom Sachs, who has converted 55,000 square feet of creaking, wooden space -- run for years by the National Guard and known as the 69th Regiment Armory until its recent rebranding -- into a sprawling amusement park for space nuts and art nuts. But unlike so much contemporary art, Sachs dispenses with high production costs in favor of his signature technique: painstakingly hand-crafted, semi-functioning sculptures made entirely from salvaged quotidian materials like foam core, plywood and duct tape, all held together with hot glue and household screws." - Emily Nathan, artnet
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Week of May 28, 2012, The Approval Matrix places Tom Sachs: Space Program Mars as Highbrow Brilliant! - The Approval Matrix, New York Magazine
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"A sculptor best known for his duct tape, foamcore and construction-barrier reproductions of Modernist furniture and buildings, guns, Hello Kitty dolls and even Nazi death camps, Sachs is now leading visitors to the Park Avenue Armory around his own private Red Planet. Temporarily ensconced within the armory’s vast Wade Thompson Drill Hall, it has a beer cooler, a hot peanuts dispensary and the aforementioned espresso machine, all stripped of polish and ready to rocket. Definitely bring the kids. “Space Program: Mars,” a collaboration between Sachs, Creative Time and the Armory, is an inner-space playground for the whole family. It’s also a serious artwork." - Linda Yablonsky, The New York Times
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"Now “Space Program” -- a deadpan trip to Mars -- has landed in the 55,000-square-foot Drill Hall of Manhattan’s Park Avenue Armory. It’s a huge installation of sculptures hand- crafted from plywood, foamcore, glue and steel. There’s a mission control, a spacecraft, a launch platform, a roving vehicle and a Darth Vader beer dispenser." - Zinta Lundborg, Bloomberg Businessweek
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"Picture an overgrown, hyperintellectual kid who’s obsessed with space travel—you know, the type who can recite the dates and details of every NASA mission. Then imagine what would happen if you gave that kid unlimited access to an old hardware shop, encouraged him to scavenge bits of wood, old toilets and discarded refrigerators from the street, and then let his imagination run wild in the 55,000-square-foot interior of the Park Avenue Armory. You would wind up with artist Tom Sachs’s monumental installation, Space Program: Mars..." - Marisa Cohen, Time Out New York Kids
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"Now we have Tom Sachs, who has converted 55,000 square feet of creaking, wooden space -- run for years by the National Guard and known as the 69th Regiment Armory until its recent rebranding -- into a sprawling amusement park for space nuts and art nuts. But unlike so much contemporary art, Sachs dispenses with high production costs in favor of his signature technique: painstakingly hand-crafted, semi-functioning sculptures made entirely from salvaged quotidian materials like foam core, plywood and duct tape, all held together with hot glue and household screws." - Emily Nathan, artnet
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"This Mars mission will go only as far up as the Upper East Side. The air its astronauts breathe will be of a late springtime New York City composition. The landing module from which they emerge will be made mostly from three-quarter-inch plywood and screws. And the surface their motorized rover explores will consist not of rocky red soil but of the flat century-old pine boards that form the immense drill floor of the Park Avenue Armory at East 66th Street, where for a month beginning Wednesday Mr. Sachs will become the latest artist to take on the daunting space." - Randy Kennedy, The New York Times
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Tune-In Music Festival

"The Park Avenue Armory is one of the grandest, most amazing performance spaces in New York City, but Friday's performance began simply and intimately. Philip Glass and Patti Smith, two icons of a certain age, walked out onstage with their arms around each others' shoulders, like two old friends. The carpets in front of the stage, where people in the cheapest (and best) seats in the house, worked at recreating the environment, as Glass described to us, of his loft decades ago. Though a recreating, the effect worked." - Steven Thrasher, The Village Voice
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"If artists and pieces that transcend genre boundaries have become the norm, we partly have the trailblazing example of Mr. Glass — who early on absorbed crucial elements from Indian music, and later collaborated with pop troubadours and master musicians from around the globe — to thank for it." - Steve Smith, The New York Times
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"For his 75th birthday, Mr. Glass played the nearly four-hour movement [Music in Twelve Parts] in its entirety at the Park Avenue Armory on Saturday night, joined by two people who were around for the work’s composition—Jon Gibson, a member of the Ensemble since 1969, on woodwinds, and Michael Riesman, Mr. Glass’s musical director, on keyboards. An endurance test for both musicians and audience, Music in Twelve Parts is often maddening, but also frequently divine. It made for a pretty unorthodox birthday party." - Michael H. Miller, NY Observer/Gallerist NY
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Merce Cunningham Dance Company

"And so you observe this grand farewell with an extraordinary sense of achievement and, paradoxically, potential. Above all, these artists dance intensely in the moment, coolly taking astounding risks. At every point in its history the Cunningham company has included several of the world’s most exceptional dancers; these glorious final heirs of the tradition, glowing with youth and beauty, make the choreography as sensuous, as rich and as complex as it has ever looked." - Alastair Macaulay, The New York Times
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"Over the New Year’s weekend, when I took a breather from the theater, I found myself enthralled by performances from the worlds of dance, music and, believe it or not, sports, that left me feeling blissfully re-energized. The most significant was the final stand of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company at the Park Avenue Armory. Had I not filed my top 10 list weeks earlier, this would have made the cut." - Charles Isherwood, The New York TImes
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"[Merce Cunningham Dance Company] itself will fold on New Year's Eve, after what will no doubt be a well-attended valedictory performance at Park Avenue Armory." - Goings On About Town, The New Yorker

STREB: Kiss the Air!

"The high point is a cascading fountain made of falling bodies instead of water jets. The performers launch themselves from multiple levels of a platform, free-falling onto mats. It has the surreal beauty of cliff-diving, only timed and synchronized." - Leigh Witchel, New York Post
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"Twenty dancers leap, fall, and fly through an elaborate set that encompasses a 21-foot rotating ladder, hoops, and water (ponchos are provided in case you don't want to get wet). The result is a thrilling performance to marvel at that conjures up memories of watching the circus or seeing a favorite superhero take flight." - Ann Binlot, ArtInfo
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Shen Wei Dance Arts

"The Park Avenue Armory is its own majestic universe. How can a regular-sized human traverse the enormity of the stage space sans roller skates? How does one avoid tripping over a humongous layered skirt and float on stage? Or run into the dark? This past Thursday the artists of Shen Wei Dance Arts spent hours working out such details." - Christine Jowers, Dance Enthusiast
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Royal Shakespeare Company

As You Like It Review “As You Like It manages to juggle mismatched lovers, Sapphic cousins, exiled noblemen, rustic vaudeville and ruminations on time and the stages of man, all with equal verve and no small dose of melancholy. That it happens in the Forest of Arden, where all these elements criss- cross and intertwine, add to the growing sense of wonder and merriment." - Jeremy Gerard and Philip Boroff, Bloomberg
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"The winter’s wind seems particularly biting in the forest of Arden that has sprung up in the Park Avenue Armory, just as the summer’s heat has begun to reach a peak. If you’re looking for an escape from swampy weather, the Royal Shakespeare Company’s production of “As You Like It” might prove just the ticket." - Charles Isherwood, The New York Times
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As You Like It Review "The chemistry between Stephens' witty Rosalind (who later poses as the male Ganymede) and O'Neill's off-handedly virile Orlando is so combustible that Bunsen burners would shatter. The mere way he looks at her and the way she's seized by passion make not only their hearts beat faster, but might even cause heart-pounding among ticket buyers." - David Finkle, TheaterMania
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"The Royal Shakespeare Company Rebuilt Its Stratford-upon-Avon Theater Inside the Park Avenue Armory" See time lapse installation video and more. - Benjamin Sutton, The L Magazine
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"I have to say, of all the amazing things I have seen in the armory over the years, this promises to be one of the best." - Wendy Goodman, New York Magazine
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"A once-in-a-lifetime theater-going experience begins this week in New York City." - Jane Levere, Forbes
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"The company has created a simulacrum of the new RST auditorium for its six‑week season in the Park Avenue Armory in New York this summer, where it will present five plays to give eager American audiences a chance to see the productions in the kind of surroundings they could have enjoyed in Stratford-upon-Avon." - Charles Spencer, The Telegraph (UK)
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"Shakespeare enthusiasts, get thee to the Armory...." - Patrick Healy, The New York Times
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RYOJI IKEDA the transfinite

“The transfinite,” a huge, immersive, electronic light-and-sound installation by the internationally celebrated avant-garde composer Ryoji Ikeda, is spectacular, trippy and fun. It is hard to imagine anyone of whatever age not enjoying its sensational effects.” - Ken Johnson, The New York Times
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"An engaging, involving symphony of sound and vision, “the transfinite” is best seen if you give yourself over to it, allowing it to merge with your soul." , This Week in New York
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"Ryoji Ikeda's the transfinite, a math-driven, psychedelic sound and light show at the Park Avenue Armory." - The Approval Matrix, New York Magazine
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"Music and math are brothers. I have been obsessed by mathematical beauty for years, but I never really studied it. I dropped out of my university and didn’t attend art or music school. When I listen to classical music, like Bach, it’s so mathematically beautiful––it feels natural for me, as a musician, to dive into the mathematical world." - As told by Ryoji Ikeda to John Arthur Peetz, ARTFORUM
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“In its combination of aggressive grandeur and obsessive detail, of magnification and miniaturisation, of focused chime and cosmic roar, the piece makes visitors feel at once like colossi and specks.” - Ariella Budick, Financial Times
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“brilliant and enthrallingly beautiful.” - George Grella, Classical TV
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Infinite Variety: Three Centuries of Red and White Quilts

Unless you’ve got something substantial galloping in the frisky bull market these days, you know it’s a bitch of a world out there. In New York, even the weather has gone fiscal: pinched and recalcitrant, snow showers landing on the daffodils, wiping the spring smiles off our sappy faces. So what do we hard-done-by people need? A freebie of pure, runaway, skipping-through-the-puddles joy, and this week we got it, courtesy of Joanna Rose and her 650 red and white quilts. - Simon Schama, Financial Times
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Tune-In Music Festival: ARCO

"The pièce d’occasion turned out to be ARCO, a surprisingly mellow yet stubbornly complex essay in communal mysticism. The institution’s [Park Avenue Armory's] first-ever commission, it placed the tireless conductor Paul Haas and a reasonably conventional orchestra called Sympho on the floor, flanked by an appreciative audience on three sides. In the course of the 90-minute performance itinerant instrumentalists and singers popped up to enrich textures and attract attention in various distant perches...For at least one witness it seemed most rewarding to just sit back, relax and enjoy the exotic ride." - Martin Bernheimer , Financial Times.com
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Tune-in Music Festival

"...there are pieces such as John Luther Adams’ Inuksuit, in which 78 percussionists with portable instruments drifted freely about the Park Avenue Armory’s spacious Wade Thompson Drill Hall last month. They strummed glockenspiels, triangles and piccolos while audience members circled around them, some staking seats on the hardwood floors." - Rachel Stern, Our Town
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"For the three remaining events this week, new-music ensemble eighth blackbird sought works that would resonate in the space. “We all in eighth blackbird were nervous about…whether we could come up with a program that would be ambitious enough to take advantage of a space that huge,” flutist Tim Munroe says." - Amanda Angel, Time Out New York
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"During Georg Friedrich Haas’s “In Vain,” the listener experiences a heightened state of awareness, becoming acutely attuned to the intricacies of a psychedelically beautiful soundscape that often unfolds in total darkness." - Vivien Schweitzer, The New York Times
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"More than 200 avant garde musicians will take over the Park Avenue Armory this week for the first ever Tune-In Music Festival." - Abbie Fentress Swanson, culture.wnyc.org
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No stranger to ambitious projects, the ensemble eighth blackbird has programmed and will perform at the inaugural Tune-in Festival at the Park Avenue Armory from February 16-20. - Amanda Angel, WQXR 105.9 fm
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Leonardo’s Last Supper: A Vision by Peter Greenaway

"Although the painted surface is flat, somehow for a moment one expects the figures again to be sculpted volumes. It is this kind of set-up that delights Greenaway. Look what can be done with light and space! In these moments the experience is truly magnificent." - Henry McMahon, artcritical
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"IF you had tied on a blindfold, suspended disbelief and allowed yourself to be carried last week to a particular location just off Park Avenue near 66th Street, your reopened eyes would have had trouble telling that they were not inside the Santa Maria delle Grazie monastery in Milan, looking at a sight everyone knows and few have actually seen: a magisterial painting of 13 enrobed men seated oddly on one side of a long dinner table." - Randy Kennedy, The New York Times
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"[Peter Greenaway] has created a dialogue between painting and film." - Pia Catton, The Wall Street Journal
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"There is a feeling around that the laptop generation believes there is no painting before Jackson Pollock and no cinema before Tarantino, and we have to prove them wrong," he [Peter Greenaway] said. - Katherine Bindley, The Wall Street Journal
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An engaging interview with Peter Greenaway about his latest project at Park Avenue Armory opening December 3, 2010. - Alexandra Peers, New York Observer
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"Peter Greenaway’s ‘Last Supper’ Coming to the Armory" - Kate Taylor, The New York Times
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CARNIVAL

Wonderful photos of Park Avenue Armory's CARNIVAL! - Katie Sokoler, Gothamist
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Open Studio: Yoshitomo Nara + YNG

"The cutesy yet devilish cartoon characters created by the Japanese neo-Pop artist Yoshitomo Nara will soon be familiar sights on the Upper East Side landscape. " - Carol Vogel, The New York Times
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Christian Boltanski, No Man’s Land

For this week’s issue, Gus Powell photographed the French artist Christian Boltanski installing his piece “No Man’s Land” at the Park Avenue Armory. - Honore Brown, The New Yorker
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"...it’s hard not to see it as a version of that childhood game, and as an embodiment of a similar, albeit more intense, kind of perplexity and heartbreak." - Dorothy Spears, The New York Times
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Stifters Dinge (U.S. Premiere)

"...equal parts musical performance, theatrical presentation, art installation and environmental space." - Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
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"The Park Avenue Armory has become a favored space for grand avant-garde productions. Next comes 'Stifter's Dinge,' a multimedia exploration (complete with five player pianos) of Romanticism and ecology by the dynamic German composer and arranger Heiner Goebbels." - Goings About Town: On the Horizon, The New Yorker

Events in honor of Merce - Memorial

"The Park Avenue Armory occupies most of a New York City block. Its main hall measures 55,000 square feet, and the curve of its roof soars to 80 feet....full of people—clumped or wandering singly—it resembles as much a grand 19th-century train station as it does a drill hall. Merce Cunningham would surely have enjoyed the dance that eddied and flowed over the vast floor at the Memorial in his honor." - Deborah Jowitt, The Village Voice
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“The startling 1881 structure, built to house the Seventh Regiment in Tiffany splendor (those were the days), is now a massive and inventive art and performance space.” - Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times
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"What an extraordinary place!" - Alastair Macaulay, The New York Times
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Les Éphémères

"The acting is of that sublime but unshowy order generally only achieved by true theatrical collectives...exemplary. The musical score by Jean-Jacques Lemêtre is among the finest I’ve yet heard for a theatrical production and is beautifully integrated." - Charles Isherwood, The New York Times
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Ernesto Neto: anthropodino

"Shen Wei imagined "anthropodino" as the dancers’ natural habitat...this was an affair to remember." - Lynda Hammes, The Economist
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"Shen Wei Dance Arts (whom you might remember from the Beijing Olympics opening ceremony) performed last night inside Ernesto Neto’s giant, interactive, multisensory Park Avenue Armory installation, anthropodino. If you weren’t lucky enough to be there...watch this video." - Jonah Green, New York Magazine
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"Equal parts exhibit, amusement and play space, the Park Avenue Armory’s first-ever commissioned art installation, Ernesto Neto’s anthropodino, completely reimagines the cavernous drill hall." - Patrisha Holly Zabrycki, Time Out New York Kids
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"A spectacular installation of gauzy Lycra fabric, dangling pods, dinosaurish wooden bones and cavernous interiors. Occupying much of the Park Avenue Armory's 55,000 square foot, 80-foot high Wade Thompson Drill Hall, Mr. Neto's ethereal construction glows like a magical destination in a children's movie." - Ken Johnson, The New York Times
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"...curvaceous, diaphanous, voluptuous, lissome...fleshy, glandular, uvular, uterine...inside the armory's vast drill hall, one of the largest unobstructed spaces in the city, the Brazilian artist Ernesto Neto has been hard at work...building a sprawling version of one of his signature biomorphic sculptures that requires all of those words and a few more to describe adequately." - Randy Kennedy, The New York Times
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"Imagine monumental, amorphous shapes of gossamer-thin fabric sacks that resemble teardrops... now picture them hanging from a bizarre weblike environment. That's what will emerge when the Brazilian artist Ernesto Neto takes over the cavernous drill shed at Park Avenue Armory." - Carol Vogel, The New York Times
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Die Soldaten

"It is good. It is very, very good." , Financial Times
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"Over the years some daring directors and conductors have walked into the Armory and become immediately enthralled with its potential..." - Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
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“Something radically different… in the vast Drill Hall of the Park Avenue Armory.” - George Loomis, The New York Sun
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“An amazing, alarming spectacle that is nearly as formidable as the infernal devices suggested in the score… Subtle, no; awesome yes.” - Alex Ross, The New Yorker
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“A miraculous realization of an opera once deemed unperformable.” - Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
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"This momentous presentation made a strong case for Zimmermann's opera as a landmark 20th-century achievement." - Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
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"Best use of an unexpected space. The Drill Hall in the Park Avenue Armory revealed itself as a venue of choice for large-scale, avant-garde extravaganzas..." , New York Magazine
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"One of The Top Ten Best Performances of 2008." - Alex Ross, The New Yorker
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Stravinsky’s Sacred Masterpieces

"A fantastic place to play..." - Daniel J. Wakin, The New York Times
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“Close your eyes, imagine yourself in some gigantic high-ceilinged cathedral ….a different way [to hear music] with its own rewards. …I liked the Armory a lot.” - Bernard Holland, The New York Times
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“Impresarios, directors and conductors are salivating at the possibilities…the vast Drill Hall, with its arching steel trusses and vast floor, is one the largest ‘indoor spaces in the city, the kind of industrial-style chamber that other cities have available to mount unconventional productions.” - Daniel J. Wakin, The New York Times
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Whitney Biennial

"At a time when performance and interactive art are so prominent, the Park Avenue Armory gives curators a variety of spaces in which to explore many art forms." - Carol Vogel, The New York Times
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“The Armory itself, exposing its wood-paneled rooms and military décor to live performance art, may have been this biennial’s best surprise.” - Kim Levin, Artnews

"Marina Rosenfeld: Screw Hannah Montana-Real Teen Music Hits the Park Avenue Armory at the Biennial." - Shakthi Jothianandan, Time Out New York
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“...at a time when performance and interactive art are so prominent, the Park Avenue Armory gives curators a variety of spaces in which to explore many art forms.” - Carol Vogel, The New York Times
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“This year’s Whitney Biennial is upstaged by a thrilling new venue... the Armory is one of the most impressive and fascinating buildings I have visited...” - Adrian Searle, The Guardian
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High Resolution

"The Park Avenue Armory has been undergoing a striking makeover seen by a dedicated conservancy." - Karen Rosenberg, The New York Times
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Aaron Young: Greeting Card

"...a trip to the Armory is worthwhile…the scale of Mr. Young’s effort is stunning." - Roberta Smith, The New York Times
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